The Neuroscience Behind Carrying Babies Keeps Them Calm

The Neuroscience Behind Carrying Babies Keeps Them Calm

Countless tired parents across the globe know the story. Walking around for hours on end, patting their over tired baby, trying to get them off to sleep. Then ever so gently lowering them into the cot only for them to open their eyes, wide-awake to start crying again!

Ahh the sheer frustration!

TREND: Seeding Newborns

TREND: Seeding Newborns

Cesarean births have long been the subject of debate and concern, from the potential complications in the mother to the long-term health outcomes of the child. The C-section birth can’t always be avoided, with medical emergencies often making such deliveries life-or-death necessities in many cases. However, the data points to decreased health outcomes for Cesarean babies, who are more likely to have respiratory complications in those critical first days. The big question for parents, doctors and researchers is ‘why?’.

Potential Benefits of Increased Access to Doula Support During Childbirth - Reserch Overview

This retrospective population study aimed to document the relationship between doula support, desire for doula support and cesarean section delivery. This study included 2400 women aged 18 to 45 years who participated in an online survey. The Listening to Mothers survey collected information about doula care alongside self reported clinical experiences, perceptions, and decisions about childbirth. In addition, the survey asked about awareness of and level of familiarity with doula care and whether women who knew about doula care would have wanted to have this type of care.

What are Doulas & Why are They Becoming so Popular?

Many women today are turning to Doulas for support through their pregnancy and birth journeys. In a time where childbirth intervention rates are climbing and more women are suffering from postnatal depression, it's no wonder women are in need of support and searching for different options.

Early-term Birth is a Risk Factor for Wheezing in Childhood: A Cross-sectional Population Study

This cross-sectional population-based study of children examined the association between gestational age at birth and the risk of respiratory illness, hospital admissions and other health related outcomes in the first 10 years of life. Participants included 13,361 preterm-born children and 13,361 term-born matched control subjects. Respiratory and neurological health was measured via a parent-completed questionnaire and hospital database records. Gestational age at birth was used to categorize the children into early-term (37-38 weeks’ gestation) and full-term (39-42 weeks’ gestation) categories. The gestational age was based on maternal reporting of the last menstrual period and antenatal ultrasound scans. 

 The results of this particular study revealed early term-born children had a significantly higher rate of caesarean section (CS) delivery, particularly those delivered by means of elective CS, compared to the full term-born control subjects. Of the children less than 5 years of age, the prevalence of wheeze, use of inhaler medication and hospital admission in first year of life were higher in the early term-born children than the full-term born control. Of the children aged 5 years and older, there was a higher prevalence in the pre term-born than full term-born subjects in wheezing, recent wheeze, doctor’s diagnosis of asthma, exercise induced asthma, chest infection over the last year, admissions to the neonatal unit in the first 28 days of life and admissions to the hospital in the first year of life. There were no statistically significant findings relating to the difference between children delivered by means of CS compared with those delivered by means of vaginal delivery (VD) for respiratory symptoms throughout childhood. However, early term–born or full term–born infants delivered by means of CS were associated with greater admissions to the neonatal unit when compared with those born early term or full term and delivered by means of VD. The children born early term by means of CS or VD had higher rates of wheezing compared with children born full term by means of VD and marginally increased rates for children born early term by means of CS compared with children born full term by means of CS.

This paper suggests that respiratory symptoms continue into early school years for early term–born children when compared with full term–born children and that these children are receiving increased treatment. The data demonstrated that early term–born children have more wheezing than full term–born control subjects. The authors suggested the possible mechanisms underlying these recurrent respiratory symptoms in children born early term might be related to delivery at a marginally earlier stage of lung growth and development when surfactant production might not be optimal.

Edwards, M.O., Kotecha, S.J., Lowe, J., Richards, L., Watkins, W.J., & Kotecha, S. (2015). Early-term birth is a risk factor for wheezing in childhood: A cross-sectional population study. 136(3), 581-587. doi: 10.1016/j.jaci.2015.05.005.

Research Overview - A Whole of Population Study of Term and Post-Term Gestational Age at Birth and Children’s Development

Research Overview -  A Whole of Population Study of Term and Post-Term Gestational Age at Birth and Children’s Development

The objective of this study was to examine the patterns of risk of poor child development among 12,601 Australian children born at term and post-term. The Australian Early Development Index (AEDI) was used to collect data on child development. This is a holistic measure of children’s development at school entry (median age 5 years) that demonstrates predictive validity for later school achievement. This measure assesses five developmental domains: physical health and wellbeing, language and cognitive skills, emotional maturity, social competence, and communication and general knowledge. The AEDI was completed by teachers during a 2009 national census of children attending their first year of school. 

Post Dates in Pregnancy

Post Dates in Pregnancy

Birth practises have changed markedly over the last 20 – 30 years and the research for the various medical interventions during pregnancy and birth is often contradictory. In my experience, as a previously registered midwife of over 25 years, the amount of information women are given today regarding pregnancy and birth is huge and can sometimes be conflicting as well as confusing. Making it difficult for women to make informed decisions.

Ground-Breaking Results: Chiropractic And Pelvic Floor Control

Ground-Breaking Results: Chiropractic And Pelvic Floor Control

This is big news for women and chiropractors alike.  This study [1] demonstrates that chiropractic care has an important impact in pregnancy. It’s just been published and in it Dr. Heidi Haavik and her co-investigators, Dr. Jenny Kruger and Professor Bernadette Murphy, show that adjusting vertebral subluxations alters pelvic floor muscle function.