THE FREE, EASY, EXERCISE THAT’S RIGHT UNDER YOUR NOSE!

THE FREE, EASY, EXERCISE THAT’S RIGHT UNDER YOUR NOSE!

Most of us can do it, and you don’t need a gym membership to sign up to this lifetime club. You know it, you love it, and you do it every day… it’s walking!

We talk about walking a lot, but that’s because we want to stress how great it is, not only for your spinal health, but overall fitness and well-being.

Smart People Worry More

Smart People Worry More

We’ve all been there, caught up in our anxious thoughts or lying in bed awake at night worrying. But new research suggests1 the smarter you are, the more likely you are to suffer from anxiety, or as they refer to it in scientific circles – psychopathology.

This link between intelligence and a predisposition towards worrying has been closely studied over the years.

Organising Intelligence – Complexity Comes For Free

Organising Intelligence – Complexity Comes For Free

The Organisational Result of Intelligence

Humanity is now entering a period of radical transformation, and recent advancements in technology are providing generative conditions.  However, within one generation, we have become disconnected from ourselves through the use of artificial intelligence. As a result, we have disconnected from our own inborn intelligence. The answer to solving this emerging problem will come from philosophy. 

Latest Research: Toxic input from the meninges primes the brain for migraines

Story at a Glance.

  • Negative input from the dura primes the brain to be too sensitive to triggers that are normally not a problem.
  • It appears that nociceptive input from the meninges causes sensitisation of the dural nociceptive system, and that this dura-nociceptive input and sensitisation causes neuroplasticity and may contribute to migraines.
  • This brings relevance to chiropractic techniques that assess and affect the meninges, and their effect on the brain and its neuroplasticity.

Abstract –

Migraine is one of the most common and most disabling disorders. Between attacks, migraine patients are otherwise normal but are sensitized to nonnoxious events known as triggers. The purpose of these studies was to investigate whether a headache-like event causes sensitization, or priming, to subsequent subthreshold events. Interleukin-6 (IL-6) was applied to the rat cranial dura mater which produced cutaneous facial and hind paw allodynia that lasted 24 hours. At 72 hours, IL-6-treated rats developed allodynia in response to dural stimulation with either a pH 6.8 or pH 7.0 solution and to a systemic nitric oxide (NO) donor, a well-known migraine trigger. Vehicle-treated rats did not respond to either pH stimulus or to the NO donor, demonstrating that IL-6 exposure primes rats to subthreshold stimuli. Inhibitors of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) signaling given either systemically or intracisternally 24 hours after IL-6 eliminated responses to dural pH stimulation at 72 hours. Additionally, intracisternal administration of BDNF without previous dural stimulation produced allodynia and once resolved, animals were primed to dural pH 6.8/pH 7.0 and a systemic NO donor. Finally, hind paw IL-6 produced paw allodynia but not priming to paw injection of pH 7.0 at 72 hours demonstrating differences in priming depending on location.

These data indicate that afferent input from the meninges produces BDNF-dependent priming of the dural nociceptive system. This primed state mimics the interictal period of migraine where attacks can be triggered by normally nonnoxious events and suggests that BDNF-dependent plasticity may contribute to migraine.

References

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27841839
Pain. 2016 Dec;157(12):2722-2730

Chronic Pain: Is It Body Or Brain?

Chronic Pain: Is It Body Or Brain?

It will come as no surprise to chiropractors (or indeed any health-care practitioner) that an alarming number of adults in the western world are chronic pain sufferers. It’s a problem that comes in many forms, from tangible disorders like back pain to more mysterious issues like fibromyalgia, but it usually results in a couple of predictable things: painkillers, and frustration as many chronic pain sufferers are told ‘its all in your head.’

New Study Shows Selfies Make You Happier

New Study Shows Selfies Make You Happier

You only have to open Facebook or jump onto Instagram to see how prolific the culture of ‘me’ has become. From people photographing the food they are about to eat, to taking posed photos of themselves smiling into the camera; it would appear that narcissism is alive and well.

The Neuroscience Behind Carrying Babies Keeps Them Calm

The Neuroscience Behind Carrying Babies Keeps Them Calm

Countless tired parents across the globe know the story. Walking around for hours on end, patting their over tired baby, trying to get them off to sleep. Then ever so gently lowering them into the cot only for them to open their eyes, wide-awake to start crying again!

Ahh the sheer frustration!

How Is The Amount Of Television You Watch Linked To Your Self-Esteem?

How Is The Amount Of Television You Watch Linked To Your Self-Esteem?

We all have those days where we size up our reflection in the mirror, sucking in our bellies and pulling back our shoulders to improve the way we look. But a recent study has shown that they way we feel about ourselves doesn’t have much to do with the mirror at all. Instead, it’s all about our level of life satisfaction.

Adrenal Exhaustion The Curse of the 21st Century? Part 1

Adrenal Exhaustion The Curse of the 21st Century? Part 1

Unless you’ve been sequestered to mars over the last five years, you’ve heard about it. Adrenal Exhaustion. It’s the by-product of our busy, non stop, super-productive, incredibly overwhelming lives. Like most big issues facing our time, it’s the light bulb’s fault. Before we had 24 hour availability to light, we used to go to bed early, get up early and pretty much eat our veggies and keep a circadian rhythm in tune with the cows.

Not so much now.  In fact, not very much at all now.  Our lives are driven by our mental ability to keep pushing ourselves forward, irrespective of what biomechanically we are doing to our bodies and our brains.

New Study: Dyslexics Have Reduced Capacity To Adapt To Sensory Input

New Study: Dyslexics Have Reduced Capacity To Adapt To Sensory Input

Scientist have been rubbing their foreheads in frustration over dyslexia, trying to find the underlying cause for dyslexics’ reading difficulties. But it’s not just dysfunction with reading that individuals with dyslexia present, they also frequently show behavioural deficits in perceptual adaptation. Or what neuroscientists call ‘rapid neural adaption’.

New Study Warns Work-Life Balance Health Risks

New Study Warns Work-Life Balance Health Risks

There’s a new magic number. 39. That’s the number of hours you should be working in any given working week. That is, unless you want to get sick. That’s a substantial number less than the 49-hour week limit that was brought in around 80 years ago as the internationally recognised number of what a person should be slogging out for a wage

Hitting the Gym better than Antidepressants New Study Finds

Hitting the Gym better than Antidepressants New Study Finds

Depression is a worldwide issue. To give you some idea, it’s the number one psychological disorder in the western world1. And not unlike the common cold, it doesn’t discriminate between age groups or gender assignment. Depression is growing in all age groups, the largest increase noted in the younger generations, in our teenagers. At the rate of knots this psychological issue is developing, by 2020, it is estimated to be the second most debilitating condition behind heart disease.

How To Build Resiliency At Work?

How To Build Resiliency At Work?

The difference between a resilient person and one who is not, is the way they approach the world and the problems they encounter. Resiliency is fostered by building a new set of attitudes and behaviours. The good news is, anyone can develop resiliency once you know what to do. Then it’s all about committing to practicing the new behaviours

People Who Don’t Like Music Are Neurologically Different

People Who Don’t Like Music Are Neurologically Different

You only have to ask someone like Jerry Maguire, driving his car, flicking through the radio stations searching for just the right song, how important music is. Music when it hits that sweet spot makes your foot tap and your heart sing. It makes you want to jump up and dance, or sing loudly out of tune. Music can bring out the depths of your sadness and trigger long lost memories. It can make you laugh or it can touch your soul. Music has been prevalent in all human cultures since we first started scratching flint together to make flames. But music, unlike other biological advantages is not associated with advancement of our species or of our survival. That is, it’s not like food or water or sex or shelter. And it doesn’t have any utility value such as money. But music ranks as one of human beings greatest sources of pleasure. Because of this there has been an assumption that the pleasure gained from music is universal. And is therefore experienced by all humans. But it’s not.  

New Study Shows Rise In Cortisol Levels Increases Aggression in Children.

New Study Shows Rise In Cortisol Levels Increases Aggression in Children.

It’s not easy being an adolescent, all those hormones flying around wreaking havoc. But new research has found it may not be all that easy being a kid either. Particularly kids who are inclined towards aggressive behaviour. A new study1 has looked into the effects of hormones on this type of behaviour in boys and girls aged between 8 and 10

Are Altruistic People Wired Differently? (Part 1 of 2)

Are Altruistic People Wired Differently? (Part 1 of 2)

Why are some people more compassionate than others? What makes one person altruistic and another self serving? Well, perhaps not surprisingly, the answer lies in our brains. To be precise the answer lies in our amygdala. The amygdala sits in the temporal lobe of your brain, under the temporal bone, which is roughly behind your ear. If you were to draw a line from the centre of your eye going into your brain and one from the centre of your ear also going into your brain, where those two lines intersect, you’ll find your amygdala.

Does Being Rich Make You Less Empathetic?

Does Being Rich Make You Less Empathetic?

If science has anything to say about it, it would appear so. Whilst one is sleeping on a soft bed, with fluffy pillows and a warm doona, it’s hard to imagine how bone-chillingly cold and uncomfortable a cold winter night must be for a homeless person. When your tummy is full of food, you can’t begin to imagine the dull ache of persistent hunger, or the drive to scavenge for food from desperate starvation. And yet these stark differences take place every day and every night.

Why Do We Cry?

Why Do We Cry?

It’s not just for babies, we all do it. Women do it more than men, on average 50 times a year, compared to the stalwart male who on average only cries 10 times a year. Children do it when they don’t get what they want, babies do it at ungodly hours of the night. We do it when we are deeply moved, sad, grieving, desolate or unhappy but we also do it through pure joy, through feeling loved and during sentimental moments.

Stress: The Brain - Body Connection

Stress: The Brain - Body Connection

The concept of adaptation is one that is central to health and indeed to the chiropractic profession. We know the human body adapts to survive on a daily basis. We see this when we encounter a virus and the body adapts to shut it down. It also occurs when we have a fever and the body adapts to take care of it, thus returning the system to homeostasis. We even adapt when we eat, by extracting the nutrients from our food and expelling the toxins and waste products.